How to Make Your Classic Car Safer to Drive

May 4, 2017

 

A classic car might seem like a fairly safe vehicle to drive. They are much larger than modern cars, don’t develop the same speeds and are made of steel instead of aluminum. However, cars made prior to the 80s are not nearly as safe as their modern counterparts. Engineering has come a long way, providing cars with safety features like bumpers, airbags and crumple zones.

Back when they first hit the streets, old timers were considered the leaders in safety and luxury. However, compared to modern cars old-timers lack the features responsible for keeping the passengers safe. Most of them don’t even have seat belts.

 

For most classic car owners there’s nothing more important than keeping their old-timers in their original state. However, cars kept in their original state are not that safe to take out on the road. On the other hand, if you own a classic car and frequently take it out for a ride, installing modern upgrades and safety mods is imperative. Fortunately, it’s also incredibly easy. Here are some of the best safety modifications to consider for your classic car.

Seat belts

The first and most obvious addition to your classic car should be the seat belts. Many old-timers do not have seat belts to begin with, and those that do probably can use an upgrade. A company specializing in classic car customizing in Huntington Beach can offer to add retro seat belts to your classic car, not taking away from its vintage appeal. The installation is easy but should be performed by professionals and not amateurs to ensure your new seat belts are safe to use.

Dual Reservoir Brake Cylinder

Another important safety upgrade is replacing your single reservoir master brake cylinder with a dual reservoir system. Many classic cars are built with the single reservoir cylinder, which makes them very dangerous to drive as they are prone to failure.

 

If the single reservoir system fails you lose all four brakes since these systems control the pressure to all the wheels. With a dual reservoir system, the pressure is divided between the two cylinders, and should one cylinder fail the other one can still apply the brakes on two wheels.

This task isn’t too complicated and there are a lot of DIY kits available. However, since your safety is at stake, you’d best leave this to a professional if your mechanical skills are anything short of advanced.

Disc Brakes

Since we’re on the subject of brakes, you should consider upgrading your old drum brakes with disc brakes. Drum brakes are not as effective and more challenging to repair as finding spare parts can prove impossible. When it comes to the passenger’s safety, having reliable brakes is not something to be stingy about.

 

Classic car drivers do drive slower and safer but are not immune to accidents. In case you plan on frequently driving your old-timer, it’s wise to invest in safety features that may save your life on the road. If you are looking for a reliable and experienced company specializing in classic car customizing in Huntington Beach, contact Chimera Motors at 714-907-0609.

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